Predation

The Metabolism and Movement of Dinoflagellate from a Chemical Perspective

Dinoflagellates produce neurotoxins that target the voltage-gated channels of muscle and nerve cells. Consumption of these toxins through contaminated seafood is the cause of human illnesses such as paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP). Some of these toxins are complex molecules and are some of the largest naturally produced carbon chains found…

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Underwater Chemists; Discussion of Design Solutions in Tintinnid Ciliates

In this essay we explore tintinnids’ intricate design solutions through the lens of chemical processes and pathways, emphasizing the vital role chemistry plays in their survival. These ciliates employ complex chemical processes that regulate digestion, reproduction, self-protection, and swimming mechanisms. We explore the cell and life cycle of tintinnids, their…

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Discussion of Nature’s Design Solutions in Tintinnids: Masters of Microzooplankton Survival

In this essay, we explore tintinnids’ survival designs within the context of fundamental physics principles. Tintinnids employ diverse mechanisms to outmaneuver predators, locate prey, and safeguard themselves. To avoid predators, tintinnids utilize specific swimming patterns, attach to groups of particles, develop symbiotic relationships with diatoms, and have undergone morphological adaptations…

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Frustules: Design solutions in Diatoms

There are many microorganisms in the universe, and they can generally be sorted into three types: prokaryotic, eukaryotic, and acellular. The subject of this paper is a member of the eukaryotic family, and they are commonly present in nature: the diatom. The diatomite which is formed by the death of…

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Exploring Aquatic Fungi Through Mathematical Tools

 The beauty of mathematics lies in its ability to create models to simplify complex things in real life and give explanations to them. Models are a great way to study and analyze species in nature and it is the same for aquatic fungi. Mathematical models also help us predict their…

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Chemical Analysis of Amoebae

Amoebae wield a fascinating array of chemical tools to increase their chances of survival and optimize their interactions with their environment. A selection of these tools will be presented and explained in this article, so that as many people as possible may gain inspiration from the ingenuity of nature’s design…

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Speed, Sense, and Strike: The Biochemistry of Tentacles and their Chemical Interactions with the Environment

Abstract The tentacle has long been a curiosity to scientists for its unique and diverse properties and functions, perhaps since antiquity when Aristotle observed the ability of cephalopods to regenerate lost tentacles and arms. Today, tentacles continue to inspire scientific innovation, such as a biomimetic recognition strategy for capturing and…

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Spines: The Multitudes and Multi-functionalities of their Mechanisms

Abstract Many organisms possess internal defense mechanisms, intrinsic properties, and behaviors adapted for their survival. Spines and quills differ immensely across families, and this disparity exacerbates further amongst taxa. Environmental pressures such as predation and habitat unique to each species results in various physical design mechanisms for spines and quills.…

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The Complexity of Spines and their Mathematical Connections

Physical phenomena seen in nature are often optimized and refined to achieve a particular function. Evaluating spines’ physical and chemical characteristics can only reveal so much in the story of the optimization process. Modeling is an extremely powerful tool to unlock the secrets of developing the hidden strengths of particular…

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A Chemical Perspective on the Carapace

Abstract The carapace’s chemical properties are of interest in a lot of scientific research since they provide insight into an organisms’ life cycles and ecological niche. This article presents a few chemical perspectives on carapace, including their evolution, calcification, pigment production, and composition. In the evolution section, the chemical processes…

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Fancy Footwork: A Morphological Study of the Role of the Hoof in Ungulate Locomotion in Habitats Around the World

In many mammals around the world, nature has designed a variable and complex structure placed at the tips of limbs called a hoof. Hoofed mammals, also called ungulates, are divided into two orders: even- and odd-toed ungulates. The divergence of these mammals from a common ancestor has led to the…

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